Maps of Carmarthenshire

Maps of Carmarthenshire

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Carmarthenshire XXX.10 (includes: Trelech Ar Betws) - 25 Inch Map

1 : 2500 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Carmarthenshire XXX.SW - OS Six-Inch Map

1 : 10560 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Carmarthenshire XXX.SW - OS Six-Inch Map

1 : 10560 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Carmarthenshire XXX.SW - OS Six-Inch Map

1 : 10560 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Carmarthen(002OSD000000010U00136000)

1 : 31680 Sand dunes and marshland dominate the landscape of Carmarthen Bay on the Bristol Channel at the bottom of this chart. The map is drawn on three sheets pieced together with detail extending over the joins. Place names are difficult to read where the drawing is ripped and worn, but the path of the River Taff is clearly plotted from centre left of the map, crossing the county until it reaches the sea at Laugharne. Archaeological details are documented even though this did not become obligatory until 1816. Budgen, Thomas
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Newcastle Emlyn (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Newcastle Emlyn (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Newcastle-in-Emlyn

1 : 31680 This plan of North Carmarthenshire shows the Teify Valley at the top, with settlements, enclosed farmland and densely wooded areas dominating the valley landscape. Mynydd Llanllwni and Pencarreg depicted at the bottom of the sheet form the valley's distinctive backdrop. Rising steeply from the valley, the rounded and open plateau summit of Mynydd Llanllwni contains extensive areas of moorland and common land, represented by open dots on the plan. Budgen, Thomas
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Carnarthen And Tenby - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Cardigan - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Carmarthen, Sheet 22 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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Pembroke, Sheet 21 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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PENBROK Comitat.

This is a map of Pembrokeshire by Christopher Saxton dating from 1578. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Burghley has annotated this map, adding place names and a dotted line marking the route from Manernowen on the coast to Cardigan. At this time England was under threat of invasion from Catholic Spain, a threat which culminated in the events of the Spanish Armada. Defence of the realm depended on a good geographic and topographic knowledge, explaining Burghley's use of maps and his annotation of them, particularly at coastal locations. The map was engraved by one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas, although the individual engraver is not noted. Saxton, Christopher William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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Penbrochia comitatus et comitatus Caermaridvnvm

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 39 x 51 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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PENBROK comitat

This map of Penbrokeshire is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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South Wales and the border in the 14th century

Rees, William Ordnance Survey
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CERETICA; | sive | CARDIGANensis | Comitatus; Anglis | CARDIGAN SHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Penbrochia Comitatus et Comitatus Caermardinum

1 : 230000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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Sheets 19-20. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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PENBROCHIA | Comitatus et Comitatus | CAERMARIDVNVM.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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RADNOR BREKNOK Cardigan et Caermarden

This map of Radnor,Cardigan, Carmarthenshire and Brecknonshire, from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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RADNOR, BREKNOK, Cardigan et Caermarden

This is a map of Radnor, Brecknock, Cardigan and Caermarthen by Christopher Saxton which dates from 1578. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Burghley has annotated this map, adding place names. At this time England was under threat of invasion from Catholic Spain, a threat which culminated in the events of the Spanish Armada. Defence of the realm depended on a good geographic and topographic knowledge, explaining Burghley's use of maps and his annotation of them. The map was engraved by one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas, although the individual engraver is not noted. Saxton, Christopher William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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England and Wales[OS civil air edition]

Ordnance Survey
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delineation of the strata of England and Wales, with part of Scotland

1 : 320000 Blatt 9 Smith, William Cary
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England and Wales 1:253,440

Ordnance Survey
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Principatus Walliae Pars Australis vulgo South-Wales

1 : 460000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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Wales.

1 : 395000 Hughes, William
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Wallia principatvs vulgo Wales

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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Cambriae typus

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 33 x 48 cm Lhuyd; Keere; Mercator; Hondius Henricus Hondius
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Cambriae typus

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 17 x 24 cm Lhuyd; Keere; Mercator Cloppenburgh
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Cambriae typvs

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 35 x 47 cm Lhuyd; Ortelius s.n.
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Cambriae typvs

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 35 x 47 cm Lhuyd; Ortelius s.n.
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