Maps of Dorset

Maps of Dorset

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delineation of the strata of England and Wales, with part of Scotland

1 : 320000 Blatt 13 Smith, William Cary
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An accurate map of Dorset Shire, divided into its hundreds

1 : 180000
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Een gedeelte vant Kanaal van Kingsbudg tot Big Berrij

England Gerard van Keulen
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An accurate map of Dorset Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 52 x 68 cm Bowen; Tinney; Bowles; Sayer; Bowles; Bowles printed for John Bowles and son in Cornhil I. Tinney at the Golden Lion in Fleet street T. Bowles in St. Pauls Church Yard and Rob.t Sayer in Fleet Street
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Comitatvs Dorcestria, sive Dorsettia; vulgo anglice Dorset Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 49 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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Map of Dorsetshire

This map comes from the Abbott's Illustrated Counties series of county guides: Dorsetshire, its history, antiquities, places of interest, etc a complete, concise and exhaustive story of Dorset from the earliest times to the present day' The Guide Printing & Publishing Co.
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An accurate map of Dorset Shire divided into hundreds

1 : 222000
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Sheets 5-6. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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COMITATVS | DORCESTRIA, | sive | DORSETTIA; | Vulgo Anglice | DORSET SHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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DORCESTRIAE

This map of Dorset is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Here the strap work cartouche is mounted by the Elizabethan coat of arms. The Seckford arms of appear at the bottom of the map, adjacent to the decorative scale bar which houses Saxton’s name. The adjacent counties are named but lack any internal detail, recording only the path of rivers that cross county boundaries. Relief, in the form of uniform rounded representations of hills, is the main topographical feature presented in the maps. Rather than provide a scientific representation of relative relief these give a general impression of the lie of the land. Settlements and notable buildings are also recorded pictorially; a small building with a spire represents a village, while more important towns are indicated by groups of buildings. Here Portland castle is marked by a castle symbol of two connected towers. Rivers, streams, parks and woodlands are also depicted carefully. Woods are shown by small tree-symbols, with clusters representing forests, and parklands enclosed with ring fences. Great decorative effect is provided by the detailed images of ships in the stippled sea. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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DORCESTRIAE Comitatus

This is a map of Dorset by Christopher Saxton, datingfrom 1575. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Lord Burghley added several place names. In the lower margin there are notes concerning 'Dangerous places for landing of men in the county'. These notes were probably written by an assistant of Lord Burghley and show the concern felt about the south coasts vulnerability to invasion. Due to the presence of a Protestant Queen in the form of Elizabeth I, England was under threat from a catholic crusade from Philip II of Spain. This threat culminated in the events of the Spanish Armada in 1588. Saxton, Christopher William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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Sheets 13-14. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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Comitatus Dorcestria vulgo anglice Dorset Shire

1 : 170000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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Ottermouth Haven [Coasts of Devon and Dorset from Dartmouth to Weymouth with a written description of Ottermouth Haven]

This is a map of the coast of Devon and Cornwall from Dartmouth to Weymouth which forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Secretary of State to Elizabeth I. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map shows the coastline in a pictorial fashion, with buildings indicated by generic, rather than individualized images of various building types. In the left hand margin is a written description of Ottermouth haven, which also features on the map itself. A dominating feature of the map in the compass rose in the centre which has lines radiating from it, each with a direction written along side it. From the style of the lettering and the depiction of the ships the map can be dated to the around 1540. Lord Burghley has annotated the map, adding a we’y of xviii foot brod’ to a narrow bridge of land and adding Sandfoot castle to the coastline to the right of the Isle Portland. The map may have originally been drawn in connection with the 1539-40 invasion scare caused by the alliance against England of France and Spain. The fortification of the Dorset coast was an essential part of the defensive preparations and in April 1539 Lord Russell surveyed the area, sending a plat’ to Cromwell which suggested a much more ambitious fortification program than was actually carried out. Sandfoot, which Lord Burghley has inserted onto this map, was in commission by 1541-1542. The fact that it does not originally appear on the map suggests that it was not built at the time of the maps execution. This is curious however as Portland Castle, built at the same time as Sandfoot, was included by the original draughtsman. The castles were intended to be able to cross fire over the important anchorage known as Portland Roads. Lord Burghley’s interest in the area can be attributed to a new invasion threat from Spain. This threat was also rooted in religious ideology as the Catholic Philip II of Spain wanted to remove the ardently Protestant Elizabeth I from the English Throne. Unfortunately, the coastal forts in Dorset, as with others in England, had been allowed to fall into disrepair. Finally in 1584 action to repair the Dorset forts was authorised by the Privy Council. William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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Comitatus Dorcestria, sive Dorsettia ; vulgo anglice Dorset Shire

1 : 145000
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Cary's Improved Map of England and Wales

Cary, George, & Cary, John London : G. & J. Cary
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Cary's Improved Map of England and Wales

Cary, George, & Cary, John London : G. & J. Cary
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Dorset, Sheet 34 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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Dorchester - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Taunton and Lyme Regis - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Bournemouth - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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The Solent - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Het eiland Wight met de rede van Portsmouth en Southampton Water

England Gerard van Keulen
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Dorset Shire, 1

2 Blätter : 109 x 54 cm s.n.
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Map of Hampshire, including the Isle of Wight, 5

1 Blatt : 52 x 68 cm s.n.
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New Forrest & Isle of Wight, Sheet 33 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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VECTIS | INSVLA. | Anglice | THE ISLE OF | WIGHT.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Exeter - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Dorset Shire, 2

2 Blätter : 109 x 53 cm s.n.
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Dorset Shire, 3

2 Blätter : 109 x 45 cm s.n.
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