Maps of Islington

Maps of Islington

$title$

A new and exact plan of the cities of London and Westminster & the borough of Southwark to this present year

1 Plan auf 2 Blättern : Kupferdruck ; 53 x 101 cm Sayer; Bowen printed and published according to act of parliament by Robert Sayer opposite Fetter lane Fleet street
$title$

LONDON 45

This map is surveyed by Richard Blome, a heraldic writer and cartographer. Although prolific, he was something of a magpie, borrowing from many sources in the creation of his maps. Engraved by Hollar, this map is dedicated to Sir Robert Vyner, whose coat of arms is depicted at the bottom. The arms of the 12 Great City companies are drawn in the side margins. These companies were the trade guilds of London, many of which have existed from the middle ages to the present day. Hollar, Wenceslaus
$title$

A plan of London

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 50 x 66 cm Rocque; Parr publish'd 29.th april according to act of parliament by John Rocque
$title$

Londini Angliæ regni metropolis delineatio accuratissima

1 Plan : Kupferdruck ; 34 x 58 cm, Bildgrösse 50 x 58 cm Aa chez Pierre vander Aa libraire imprimeur de l'université et de la ville
$title$

Plan de Londres tel quil Etoit avant l' incendre de 1666 Grave par Hollar

This is a later edition of a 1666map surveyed by Blome and engraved by Hollar. The title appears in French in a panel below the plan, with the key to streets and public buildings appearing in tables at top right, top left and bottom right. A compass star and scale bar are drawn at bottom right. Down both sides of the map are the coats of arms of the 12 Great City Companies (trade guilds), many of which have existed from the middle ages to the present day. Richard Blome was a heraldic writer and cartographer. His maps were often derivative, based on existing sources rather than original surveys. Blome, Richard
$title$

A PLAN of the CITIES of LONDON & WESTMINSTER, THE BOROUGH OF SOUTHWARK and their Suburbs BY WILLIAM FADEN Geogr to the King MDCCLXXXV

The title of this map is arranged in an ornamental surround in which reclines the figure of Thamesis. Cross-hatching and stippling are used to distinguish land use, with differentiation made between fields and park land. Hyde Park features prominently on the plan. Deer were hunted here until 1768.It was also a well-known duelling ground. A particularly protracted and bloody duel was fought in 1772 between a Mr.Sheridan and a Captain Matthews over the honour of a certain Miss Lineley. Reports of the duel appeared in all the papers, scandalising the London public. Faden, William
$title$

PLAN OF LONDON FROM AN ACTUAL SURVEY 238

This map is set within a decorative border. Its title appears along the top, with the arms of the city, the royal family and Westminster. Around the margin are pictorial views of prominent buildings and landmarks, including the Bank of England, Lambeth Palace, Covent Garden and Waterloo Bridge. The map is a later edition of one first issued as a free supplement of the 'United Kingdom' newspaper in 1832, adding the Greenwich and Birmingham railway lines. Shury, John
$title$

A PLAN OF LONDON WESTMINSTER AND SOUTHWARK

The title of this small map of London appears at top right, with publisher's imprint below the map. The river, city boundaries and open spaces are distinguished by colour use. Phillips, Richard
$title$

PLAN OF LONDON FROM AN ACTUAL SURVEY 233

This map was issued as a free supplementin the 'United Kingdom' newspaper.Surrounded by a decorative border, the map's title appears in a panel above the plan, with the arms of London, the royal family and the City of Westminster.Inset within the border areillustrations of prominent buildings and landmarks, including the Bank of England, Lambeth Palace, Covent Garden and Waterloo Bridge. The map shows the intended tunnel under the Thames linking Wapping and RotherhitheWhen, the firstunderwater tunnel in the world when it opened in 1843. Shury, John
$title$

PLAN OF LONDON FROM AN ACTUAL SURVEY 243

This is a later edition of Shury's map of London first issued in 1832. The map features title along the top with the arms of the cities of London and Westminster. Down both sides of the map and along the bottom are 33 views of London buildings and landmarks. The East India House, Custom House, the Mint, St James's Palace, Christ's Hospital, the new Post Office, the bank of England, Hanover Terrace, the Corn Exchange and the Coliseum are depicted down the left side of the plate. Along the bottom are views of St Katherine's Chapel, Caledonian Church, mansion House, the Royal Exchange, Temple Bar, Guild Hall, Buckingham Palace, St Paul's Cathedral, the Monument, St Bride's Church, Lambeth Palace, Westminster Abbey and the entrance to Green Park. Down the right side of the plate are views of the House of Lords, London Bridge, the House of Commons, Waterloo Bridge, Drury Lane Theatre, Horse Guard, the King's College, Covent Garden Theatre, Somerset House and Gloucester Terrace. Shury, John
$title$

Londres (avec le bourg de Southwark)

1 Plan : Kupferdruck ; 26 x 45 cm, Bildgrösse 32 x 45 cm Mentelle; Tardieu; Dubuisson Mentelle
$title$

This actual survey of London Westminster Soutwark is humbly dedicated to y.e L.d Mayor [and] court of Aldermen

1 Plan auf 2 Blättern : Kupferdruck ; 58 x 98 cm chez Iean Cóvens et Corneille Mortier libraires et marchands des cartes
$title$

[A plan of London]

1 Plan : Kupferdruck ; 49 x 66 cm Rocque; Parr John Rocque
$title$

PLAN OF LONDON FROM AN ACTUAL SURVEY WITH ALL THE RAILROADS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO THE PRESENT TIME

This map of Victorian London is set within a decorative border, featuring title and publisher's imprint in a panel above the plan, and views of the city's prominent buildings and landmarks along the margins. This is a later edition of the map first published by Shury in 1832, featuring new railway lines and a pictorial view of Crystal Palace, venue of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Shury, John
$title$

NEW PLAN OF LONDON, WESTMINSTER AND SOUTHWARK

This is a later edition of the map of London, Westminster and Southwark first issued by Gardner in 1827. The map is enclosed in a border and features title along the top, key and scale bar along the bottom, with borough boundaries, open spaces and water courses and main roads in colour. Additions to earlier editions of the map include the Great Western, London and Birmingham, Eastern Counties, Blackwall and Croydon railways. Gardner, James
$title$

IMPROVED MAP OF LONDON for 1834, from AN ACTUAL SURVEY

The title of this map appears in a panel above the plan, with a scale bar inset in the bottom border. The map extends westward to include Chelsea Beach and shows the proposed tunnel under the Thames at Wapping. The Greenwich-to-London railway line also features. Under construction at the time of this survey, the line reached Bermondsey from Greenwich in 1836. Ten months later the line reached London Bridge, making it the first railway terminus in the capital.
$title$

TEGG'S NEW PLAN OF LONDON, &c. WITH 360 REFERENCES TO THE PRINCIPAL STREETS &c.

The title of this folding map of London appears along the top. The city boundaries, open spaces, roads and watercourses are depicted in colour in colour. This is a later edition of a map first issued by Tegg in 1823. It is divided into rectangles for reference, with a street index in panel below the plan. Tegg, Thomas
$title$

Tegg's new plan of London, &c.

T. Tegg
$title$

London, Westminster, and Southwark

The map reports all the street names in London, Westminster and Southwark, with the scale bar given at bottom left. Faden, William
$title$

LONDON 76

This small map of London and suburbs was included in a small 1707French travel book, "Les Delices de la Grande Bretagne". It features a compass rose at bottom right, and a title with reference panel below the plan. Bevereel, James
$title$

MOGG'S NEW LONDON GUIDE, 1849. The Coloured lines exhibit the Omnibus routes.

The "coloured roads" referred to in the title of this map are now faded, with only a pale orange remaining. The circle marked on the map just above St. Paul’s covers a radius of two miles around the Post Office. The Post Office was erected on the site of St Martin-le-Grand. Designed by Sir Robert Smirke, it was opened in 1829.The expanding railway network is evident in the five lines coming into London. Mogg, Edward
$title$

Maps of Old London-J. Rocque

Mitton, Geraldine Edith
$title$

A Mapp of the Cityies of LONDON & WESTMINSTER & BURROUGH of SOUTHWARK with their Suburbs and the Addition of the New Buildings

The title of this map of London, Westminster and Southwark appears along the top, with a reference table (flanked by sword and mace-bearer) at top left, a figure of Mercury (with the city arms on his shield) at top centre, and a second reference table below city arms at top right. The key to places in Southwark appear in a table at St. George's Fields, with compass star and scale bar at bottom centre and an allegorical figure of Father Thames at bottom right. John Oliver first issued this map in 1680.This is a later edition published and sold by John Bowles from his shop at the Black Horse in Cornhill. Oliver, John
$title$

LONDON AND WESTMINSTER 1795

This is the second edition of a map published seven times until 1806. The title is embellished with an engraving of Father Thames, with St Paul's visible in the distance to one side of him. This edition includes an inset plan of the proposed Wet Docks. In 1796, the year this map was published, a Parliamentary Committee attempted to resolve the docking problems such as congestion, delays, lack of warehouse space and theft. The result was a number of project proposals for the building of new docks. However, none of these proposals were carried out, and the problem was not solved until private companies began building enclosed docks in 1802. Fairburn, John
$title$

CROSS'S LONDON GUIDE

This is the second edition of Cross's London Guide, originally published in 1837 and issued four times. The cover title of this edition is 'CROSS'S POCKET PLAN OF LONDON AND STREET DIRECTORY 1844'. Its principal interest lies in its detailing of the expansion of the railways. London's first railway was opened in 1836, running between Bermondsey and Deptford, reducing the average travelling time from an hour to eight minutes. This line was extended to Greenwich and London Bridge, with the extension recorded on the map. By 1841 there were six terminal stations in London, with railways linking London with Birmingham and Southampton. These terminals were set at a distance from the centre of the city, due to fears of street congestion. This map shows the Great Western, Birmingham, Eastern Counties, Blackwall, Southampton and Croydon railways. The intended position of Hungerford Bridge is also shown. Cross, Joseph
$title$

LONDINUM, LONDON

This small map possibly derives from a German work published in Nuremberg.
$title$

LEIGH'S NEW PLAN OF LONDON 212

This is the second edition of a map of London first published in 'Leigh's New Picture of London'. The title appears along the top with a scale bar at the top right. The map is divided into half-mile squares with letters along the top borders for reference. It also shows Southwark Bridge and the proposed New North Road across Finsbury Fields. Hall, S.
$title$

PAYNE'S IMPROVED PLAN OF LONDON

The title of this map appears at top right alongside the publisher’s imprint (in shield) and the city arms. The map is divided in half-mile squares with letters and numbers for reference running along the borders. It shows the Dover, Croydon, Greenwich, Blackwall, Eastern, North London, Great Northern and Birmingham railway lines and their termini. Payne, Albert Henry
$title$

Reynolds's distance map of London, for ascertaining cab fares & shewing the distances in every direction from the railway stations &c.

James Reynolds
$title$

To Martin Folkes esq.r, president of the Royal Society : this plan of the cities of London and Westminster and borough of Southwark, with the contiguous buildings is humbly inscribed

1 : 15000 Rocque, John, d. 1762 John Pine ; John Tinney, print and map sellar
© MapTiler © OpenStreetMap contributors
How does it work?
These instructions will show you how to find historical maps online.
Getting started
Type the place name in the search box to find the exact location. You can further adjust the search by zooming in and out.
Zoom
Zoom in and out with the buttons or use your mouse or touchpad natively.
Exact Area tool
Click here and draw a rectangle over the map to precisely define the search area.
Set filters
Narrow your search with advanced settings, such as Years (from/to), Fulltext, Publisher, etc.
Results
See the results of your search on the right side. You can scroll down to find more maps of this location.
?

Download OldMapsOnline Mobile