Maps of Rhondda, Cynon, Taff

Maps of Rhondda, Cynon, Taff

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Swansea, Sheet 27 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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GLAMORGA Comitatu

This map of Glamorgan is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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Glamorganensis comitatvs; vulgo Glamorgan Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 49 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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GLAMORGANENSIS | COMITATVS; Vulgo | GLAMORGAN SHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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GLAMORGA[N] Comitatus

This is a map of Glamorgan by Christopher Saxton dating from 1578. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Burghley has annotated this map, adding place names, particularly along the coast. At this time England was under threat of invasion from Catholic Spain, a threat which culminated in the events of the Spanish Armada and explains the preoccupation with coastal areas demonstrated here. The map was engraved by one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas, although the individual engraver is not noted. Saxton, Christopher William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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Swansea - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Cardiff - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Aberdare

1 : 31680 With 8,000 inhabitants, Merthyr Tydfil was the largest town in Wales during the 19th century. The town, appearing towards the right-hand margin, had access to large supplies of iron and coal, attracting ironmasters and ironworkers from miles away with the promise of high wages and good housing. A network of tramroads, the horse-worked railways that predated the locomotive era, was laid out to transport coal and ore from the pits to the iron works. The drawing indicates these tramroads with double dotted lines. Mines are shown as dots within circles. Budgen, Thomas
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Bridgend

1 : 31680 Thomas Budgen, who worked on the majority of the Welsh plans, is probably the author of this drawing of part of Glamorgan. Following military convention, Mynydd Maendy, Mynydd Llangeinwyr and other reliefs to the north of Bridgens are represented by dense hachuring (interlining)graduating to lighter bands towards the summits. Commons, broken mountainland and upland moors are represented by open dotting. In the lower part of the sheet, field boundaries indicate agricultural land. Budgen, Thomas
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Llantrisant

This plan covers part of the southern Welsh coast. Field boundaries and woodland are indicated. Shading and soft brushwork interlining ('hachuring') denote relief. The detailed recording of the undulations of the land is a defining feature of Ordnance Survey drawings, revealing the strategic and military impetus behind the scheme. Budgen, Thomas
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Swansea

This plan of the Gower peninsula and Swansea Bay shows the contemporary development of Swansea harbour at the mouth of the River Towe. It also details the canals connecting this tidal port to the coalfields of the Swansea Valley and to Llansamlet, where coal had been worked extensively since the 18th century. Budgen, Thomas
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Ammanford (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Ammanford (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Swansea (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Swansea (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Merthyr Tydfil (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Merthyr Tydfil (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Pontypridd (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Pontypridd (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Pontypridd (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Pontypridd (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Llanon

1 : 31680 Widely dispersed farms form the prevailing settlement pattern of this part of South Carmarthenshire. Shown near the top are Towy Valley, the major historic route into west Wales, and the Roman road from Carmarthen to Llandovery. Llanon is depicted near the centre along the tollroad from Llanelly. Situated on the north bank of the River Burry, Llanelly was a small parish town at the time of the Ordnance Survey. Sand dunes and marshland dominate the landscape of The Burry inlet at the bottom of the sheet. Budgen, Thomas
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Carmarthen(002OSD000000010U00137000)

1 : 31680 This plan comprises two sheets joined together, depicting Carmarthen Bay on the Bristol Channel and the upper tidal reaches of the River Towy. The irregularly shaped paper is so worn that much of the detail is now erased. Sand dunes and marshland dominate the landscape of the Cefn Sidan Sands at the bottom of the chart and a faded aquamarine wash remains visible on the Rivers Taf and Towy. Budgen, Thomas
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Bedwas

1 : 31680 .Bedwas was one of the first industrial towns in England. The surrounding area is rich in coal, iron ore and limestone deposits. There is evidence that suggests the monks of Neath Abbey,amp; may have been using coal to make iron since AD1284. By the early 19th century, an elaborate network of horse-worked railways ('iron ways') was being built to connect collieries and ironworks. These are indicated on the plan by parallel lines highlighted in yellow ochre. Budgen, Charles
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SN41 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SN40 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SN51 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SN50 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SS59 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SN61 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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