Maps of Hertfordshire

Maps of Hertfordshire

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Bedford, Hertford, Sheet 25 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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Middelsexiae cum Hertfordiae Comitatu = Midlesex & Hertford Shire

1 : 160000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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HERTFORDIA | COMITATVS. | Vernacule | HERTFORDSHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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HARTFORDIAE COMITATUS Sheet 13

This map of Hertfordshire is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. A decorative scale bar houses Saxton’s name and the name of the engraver Remigius Hogenberg, one of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Relief, in the form of uniform rounded representations of hills, is the main topographical feature presented in the maps. Rather than provide a scientific representation of relative relief these give a general impression of the lie of the land. Settlements and notable buildings are also recorded pictorially; a small building with a spire represents a village, while more important towns, such as Hereford are indicated by groups of buildings. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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HARTFORDIAE COMITATUS f.34

This is a map of Herefordshire by Christopher Saxton which dates from 1577. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Lord Burghley has added several place names to the map. This map was engraved by Nicholaus Reynoldus one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produced the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Reynoldus, Nicholaus
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Middelsexiæ cum Hertfordiæ comitatu

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 42 x 52 cm Valck; Schenk apud G. Valk et P. Schenk
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Hertfordia comitatvs vernacule Hertfordshire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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REGIONIS, qvae est circa LONDINVM, specialis repraesentatio geographica

1 : 190000 Bowles, Thomas curantibus Homan[n]ianis Heredibus
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Les environs de Londres

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 47 x 55 cm Le Rouge par et chez le Sr. le Rouge ingenieur geographe du roi rue des Augustins vis a vis le panier Fleury
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A new improved map of Hartford Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 51 x 64 cm Kitchin; Hinton; Walker sold by I. Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church yard
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A topographical map of Hartford-Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 52 x 70 cm Dury; Andrews Andrew Dury
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Bedford and Luton - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Public open spaces

1 : 189000 Waterlow & sons
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To the Nobility & Gentry of Essex

Pask, Joseph Robert Morden
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A TOPGRAPHICAL MAP OF THE COUNTRY TWENTY MILES ROUND LONDON

In the second half of the18th century, the introduction of turnpike roads and the increased coach-traffic in and out of London contributed to the popularity of the maps of the countryside around the capital. The title of this circular map runs along the top, with points on the compass marked on the border. A list of main roads to and from London is provided at bottom left, with a key at bottom right and scale bar below the plan. Faden, William
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Ordnance Survey of England and Wales (Sheet 7), South Wales

Ordnance Survey, Great Britain
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A NEW and CORRECT MAP of the COUNTRIES TWENTY MILES Round LONDON.

In the second half of the18th century, the introduction of turnpike roads and the increased coach-traffic in and out of London contributed to the popularity of the maps of the countryside around the capital. This map was published in Henry Chamberlain's 1770 'A New and Compleat History and Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster.' The map's title features along the top, with a scale bar and explanatory note below the plan, and border divided in degrees of latitude and longitude. Churches, hills and other architectural or geographical landmarks are indicated by symbols. Market towns are marked by stars. Bowen, Thomas
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Delineatio ac finitima regio Magnæ Brittaniæ metropoleos Londini

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 48 x 57 cm Lotter Tobias Konrad Lotter
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Les environs de Londres

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 47 x 53 cm chez I. Côvens et C. Mortier
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London N.W. - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Map showing the general Boundaries of the GENERAL POST DELIVERY; of the FOREIGN DELIVERY; of the Town Delivery of the Two penny Post Department; and of the COUNTRY DELIVERY

This map of the area round London was produced by order of the House of Commons for the 21st report of the Commissioners of Revenue Inquiry. The map's title is at top right with areas of various postal delivery services highlighted in colour. Basire, James
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Saffron Walden - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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The county of Bedford

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 68 x 45 cm Jefferys s.n.
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An accurate map of the county of Bedford

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 68 x 50 cm Bowen; Hinton sold by I Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church Yard
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A New and Correct Mapp of Middlesex, Essex and Hertfordshire

Bland, Joseph, Parker, Samuel, Smyth, Payler and Warburton, John
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Leigh's new map of the environs of London

1 : 247000 drawn and engraved by Sidy. Hall, 14 Bury St., Bloomsby London : Leigh
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An accurate MAP of the Country TWENTY MILES round LONDON. From GRAVESEND to WINDSOR East and West, and from ST. ALBANS to WESTERHAM North and South with the CIRCUIT of the PENNY POST

In the second half of the18th century, the introduction of turnpike roads and the increased coach-traffic in and out of London contributed to the popularity of the maps of the countryside around the capital. The title of this plan runs along the top, with borders divided in degrees of latitude and longitude, county boundaries outlined in colour and the circuit of the Penny Postmarked in red. Before William Dockwra set up the Penny Post in 1680, there was no local delivery of letters in London, except by private courier. Dockwra opened seven sorting offices and hundreds of receiving houses. Letters were delivered to addresses in London for the charge of a penny, paid by the sender. An extra penny was charged for deliveries in the London Country area within ten miles of the city. In 1682, the Post Office took over the running of the service. Cary, John
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Delineatio ac finitima regio Magnae Brittaniae metropoleos Londini

1 : 120000 ad novissimam Normam repraesentata et excusa a T. Conr. Lotter, Augustano Chalcogr. Et Geogr. [Augsburg] : [Tobias Konrad Lotter]
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