Maps of Norfolk

Maps of Norfolk

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Ordnance Survey of England and Wales (Sheet 9), East Anglia

Ordnance Survey, Great Britain
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SUFFOLCIAE Comitatus f.38

This is a map of Suffolk by Christopher Saxton which dates from 1576. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. This map, unlike many of the others in the series, is divided into administrative units called hundreds which are shown by areas of different coloured. Lord Burghley has added information to the map, particularly along the coast line, knowledge of which was vital for defence.The map was engraved by Lenaert Terwoot, one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Terwoot, Lenaert
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NORTFOLCIA; | NORFOLKE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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NORFOLCIAE comitatus f.40

This is a map of Norfolk. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. This map is different from others in the series as it shows the county divided into administrative units called hundreds’ These are indicated by an alphabetical key, differentiated by colour and referenced to a index. Lord Burghley has added several place names. The map was engraved by Cornelius Hogius, one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Hogius, Cornelius
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NORFOLCIAE comitatus Sheet 17

This map of Norfolk is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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Nortfolcia vernacule Norfolke

1 : 260000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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A new travelling map of the country round London, 2

1 Blatt : 49 x 60 cm J. Andrews & A. Drury
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SUFFOLCIAE Comitatus Sheet 16

This map of Suffolk is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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Suffolcia vernacule Suffolke

1 : 240000 Joannes Janssonius excudit. [Amstelodami] : [apud Joannem Janssonium]
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SVFFOLCIA. | Vernacule | SVFFOLKE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Sheets 35-36. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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An accurate map of the county of Norfolk

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 52 x 70 cm Bowen; Hinton sold by I. Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church yard
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Nortfolcia; vernacule Norfolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 36 x 47 cm Valck; Schenk penes Gerardum Valk et Petrum Schenk
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Nortfolcia

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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An accurate map of the county of Suffolk

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 50 x 69 cm Bowen; Hinton sold by I. Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church Yard
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Suffolcia vernacula Suffolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 36 x 47 cm Valck; Schenk penes Gerardum Valk et Petrum Schenk
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Svffolcia, vernacule Svffolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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Suffolk, Sheet 20 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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Norfolk, Sheet 15 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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A Coloured Chart of the Coast of Suffolk, from Orwell Haven to Gorlston, near Yarmouth

This is a map of the Suffolk coast stretching from Orwell Haven to Godeston near Yarmouth. It details the defences of the area may be part of the coastal survey of 1539. Fortification of large sections of coast was carried out at this time as Henry VIII feared an invasion from the combined forces of France and Spain. In 1538 Francis I of France, and Charles V Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain signed a peace treaty. This union gave rise to the possibility that France and Spain may combine forces to invade England. France was England’s historical enemy and Henry VIII’s divorce of Catherine of Aragon, Charles V’s aunt, had offended the militantly catholic King of Spain. The map includes a vignette view of Ipswich, and a depiction of Orford Castle, built by Henry II in the 1160’s to guard what was then a busy port. Here a beacon is shown on the battlements, indicating that the castle, built on raised grown, has been incorporated into the early warning system that is depicted along the coast by numerous beacons. Two round tower forts are shown with gun ports and extended cannons. Such a large scale fortification plan was greatly aided by the significant advances in cartography and surveying which occurred in the Tudor period. The vast wealth Henry VIII had at his disposal after the dissolution of the monasteries provided the necessary finances for the survey.
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The Fens

This is a map of the fenlands dating from around 1603. It is thought to be the model for Hondius's "A generall plotte of the Fennes" published in Amsterdam in 1632 and is signed Ro. Cotton. The map shows the area in some detail, generalised representations of churches represent small settlements. Larger towns such as Cambridge and Bury St Edmunds' are shown in more detail with individualised red roofed buildings. The sands or the washes are indicated by dotted lines and a beacon is marked on the sands. A notable feature of the drawing is the proliferation of windmills as the wind from the sea can move inland unhindered by hills.
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Lowestoft - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Ipswitch - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Fakenham - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Colchester - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Bury St Edmunds - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Norwich - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Ipswich

1 : 31680 This drawing of parts of Essex and Suffolk is made up from four conjoined sheets mounted on stiff card. Verron's reputation as a surveyor suffered over the course of the survey. A letter from Survey Superintendent, William Mudge, dated 11 October 1820, reads: "Mr Stanley is going with me ...to Woodbridge to examine what is necessary to be done with Mr Verron's Plans...I apprehend they are much worse than... I expected." Verron
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