Maps of Portsmouth

Maps of Portsmouth

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O anglickém průlivu

1 : 290000 Isle of Wight (Anglie) Hanf, Norbert Kořenský, Josef J. Otta
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V anglickém průlivu

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The Solent - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Isle of Wight

This is a manuscript map of the Isle of Wight. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. It is thought to be by John Rudd, the man to whom Christopher Saxton was an apprentice to in 1570. John Rudd was Vicar of Dewsbury from 1554 to 1570. Rudd had a keen interest in cartography and had been engaged in the 1550s in making a "platt" of England. In 1561 Rudd was granted leave to travel further to map the country and it is likely that Saxton accompanied him, acquiring his skills for surveying. The map shows the Isle of Wight and the coast of Hampshire. By the end of the reign of Henry VIII this area was one of the most heavily defended areas in Northern Europe, the reason for this being the need to defend the vital navel base of Portsmouth and the access that could be gained to this via the Solent. Portsmouth was provided with defensive structures in the 1520’s, making them one of the earliest artillery defences in Britain. The angular lines of these defences are shown here. The distinguishing feature of this map is that the many fortifications in the area are noted and that the draughtsman has recorded the actual architectural plans of the castles. The trefoil shape of Hurst castle is clearly delineated as is the rectangular and triangular bastioned outline of Southsea castle. Calshot castle is marked on the map as Calsharde’. This fort was vital in that it controlled the entrance to Southampton water and linked defensively with the forts of East and West Cowes, located opposite Calshot on the Isle of Wight on either side of the Medina River, which provides access to the centre of the island. In the centre of the Isle, Carisbrooke castle is shown. The draughtsman has recorded the walled and roughly rectangular shape. Interestingly at St Helen’s a plan of a concentric segmented circular structure is shown. This may be a fortification built sometime between 1539 and 1552 to defend the landing, of which little is now known. [Rudd, John] William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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VECTIS | INSVLA. | Anglice | THE ISLE OF | WIGHT.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Wight[The Isle of]

Fowles, A.W. Ventnor
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Lymington (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Lymington (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Map of the Isle of Wight

1 : 78000 Isle of Wight (Anglie) Edward Stanford
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A coloured chart of Portsmouth Harbour, Spithead, and part of the Isle of Wight, on a scale of one mile to an inch

This is a map of Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight dating from 1585. It has been annotated by William Cecil Lord Burghley, Secretary of State to Elizabeth I, who has added the names "Westburhunt" and "Chichest". Burghley was an avid map collector and his application of geographical knowledge to matters of government is well known. Three beacons are indicated on 'Portesdowne', showing the systems in place for alerting the locality in an invasion scenario. Either side of these beacons are red windmill symbols named "westmyll" and "estmill", two further windmills, again highlighted in red, lie towards the centre of the map. It is likely that these have been highlighted due to their height which would facilitate their use as vantage points or beacons. There is a scale bar indicating a scale of one inch to a mile. Portsmouth became the focus of a new program of defensive works in 1584. Since the accession of the Protestant Elizabeth I to the English throne in 1558 Anglo-Spanish relationship had deteriorated. The continued English raids on Spanish colonial interests and England’s support of the Protestant rebellion in the Spanish ruled Netherlands had induced the Catholic Philip II to plan an invasion of England. It is likely that this map, detailing the beacons in the area, was produced for military purposes connected with the strengthening of the defences for the Portsmouth area against the expected Spanish Invasion. William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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Beaulieu

This drawing covers a section of the south coast bordering the Solent and Southampton Water. The defence requirements of this area were considerable as the Solent gave access to the important ports of Portsmouth and Southampton. Calshot Castle, shown here in red and black at the mouth of Southampton Water, was built by Henry VIII as part of a defensive chain defending the coast by cannon power. The drawing features a large decorative compass whose rays are visible extending to the edge of the land mass. Several corrections can be seen in black ink, where place names and the exact course of roads have been altered.
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Portsmouth (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Portsmouth (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Newport 27A

1 : 10560 This plan of the Isle of Wight extends from the Newport estuary, at the top of the map, to the chalk downlands near Brixton, Shorwell and Chillerton, at the bottom. The drawing is made on rectangular sheet lines, enclosed by a black border. Fields are coloured brown where cultivated, and green or blank if untilled. The Norman and Tudor Carisbrooke Castle is represented pictorially below Newport, and named in gothic lettering. Gardner, William
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SU60 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SZ69 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SU50 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SZ59 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SU40 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SZ49 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SU30 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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SZ39 - OS 1:25,000 Provisional Series Map

1 : 25000 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Southampton (Hills) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Southampton (Outline) - OS One-Inch Revised New Series

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Portsmouth

This drawing was surveyed in 1797, The year Napoleon declared that France "must destroy the English monarchy, Or expect itself to be destroyed by these intriguing and enterprising islanders. Let us concentrate all our efforts on the navy and annihilate England. That done, Europe is at our feet." The detail with which the area is surveyed reflects the danger the English establishment felt. The dockyards of Portsmouth, One of most important naval sites in Britain, Are shown by red blocks. The defence fortifications of the area are clearly delineated. South Sea Castle, One of the defensive forts built on the south coast by Henry VIII, Is shown in plan form.
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St Helens 27A

1 : 10560 This plan of the Isle of Wight extends from Sandown Bay, At the bottom right, To Haven Street, At the top. The drawing is made on rectangular sheet lines, Enclosed by a black border. Fields are coloured brown where cultivated, And green or blank if untilled. Stonework buildings or structures are drawn in red ink at major settlements like Newchurch and Brading. Infilled or blocked areas of black or sepia ink depict structures or buildings made from impermanent materials such as wood. Coniferous trees are distinguished pictorially from deciduous trees on this map. Gardner, William
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Yarmouth 27A

1 : 10560 A high chalk ridge dominates the coastline at the bottom of this plan of the Isle of Wight, ending in the sea at the far left, where the three pinnacles of the Needles rise to a height of about 30 metres. The drawing is made on rectangular sheet lines, enclosed by a black border. Stonework buildings or structures are drawn in red ink at major settlements like Yarmouth at the top of the map. Gardner, William
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Cowes 27A

1 : 10560 This plan of the Isle of Wight shows the River Medina flowing north into the Solent Channel, at the top of the map between West and East Cowes. The drawing is made on rectangular sheet lines, enclosed by a black border. Stonework buildings and structures are drawn in red ink at major settlements such as Newtown and Cowes. Irregular field boundaries dominate the coastal landscape. The care with which they are delineated suggests they were measured rather than estimated or sketched by the surveyor. Gardner, William
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