Maps of Westminster

Maps of Westminster

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Insurance Plan of London Western District Vol. A: sheet 7

1 : 480 This detailed 1901 plan of London is one of a series of forty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London West Vol. A: sheet 7

1 : 480 This detailed 1891 plan of London is one of a series of fourteen sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Western District Vol. A: sheet 6-2

1 : 480 This detailed 1901 plan of London is one of a series of forty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London West Vol. A: sheet 6-2

1 : 480 This detailed 1891 plan of London is one of a series of fourteen sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Dean Yard [A Plan of], taken in the year 1734 & 1748.

This is a retrospective plan made from an earlier drawing. It shows the buildings that once covered the southern half of Deans Yard. Among these are the Quaker Meeting House, the Quaker School, the Little Almonry and the Alms Houses. Smith, John Thomas
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A MAPP of the Parish of St MARGARETS Westminster taken from the last Survey with Corrections 7 B

This is John Strype's second edition of Stow's survey, published "due to Act of Parliament". This is a reference to the Copyright Act just passed in an effort to stop unauthorised copying of maps. John Stow was a retired sailor who dedicated his retirement to gathering information from records and residents of the Georgian city. The survey extended to include London and Westminster in their entirety, capturing London between Restoration and 18th-century developments. The land on Mill Bank is denoted "Marshy Ground". Renowned for its unhealthy damp atmosphere, it would become the site of the infamous Millbank Penitentiary, and later Tate Britain. Above this a "New Church" sin the process of completion. This would become St John's. Although the survey proved popular, Stow died in poverty at the age of 80,having been granted licence to beg by James I. Stow, John
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A PLAN of the Lower Parts of the Parishes of ST Margaret and ST JOHN the EVANGELIST, WESTMINSTER, from the HORSE FERRY to WHITEHALL, taken from an ACTUAL SURVEY

1 : 2286 This map shows developments around Westminster Abbey and on the bank of the Thames. Lediard, T.
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London VII.83 - OS London Town Plan

1 : 1056 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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A PLAN of Part of the Ancient City of WESTMINSTER

1 : 1010 In the forty years prior to the publication of this map Sir Christopher Wren had been surveyor of the area around Westminster Abbey and had undertaken restoration work, while his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor designed the West Towers. The layout of individual piers in Westminster Abbey is shown. C. Fourdrinier & Co,
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Manuscript] Procession of the Coronation of King George the Second and his Quee

1 : 900 This manuscript plan shows the route of the procession of George II's Coronation, from Westminster Hall to the Abbey. George II's reign was dominated by the Jacobin conflict, and his reign was threatened in 1745 by Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, who landed in Scotland. The Jacobite threat came to an end when Charles was defeated at the Battle of Culloden in April 1746.The country prospered greatly during George II's reign, with the coal and shipbuilding industries becoming more productive, an overall growth in the population, and the establishment of British control in Madras and Bengal.
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A PLAN of Part of the Ancient City of Westminster

1 : 1028 Thomas Lediard was the agent and surveyor for the Commission for Streets and Waterways.Westminster bridge, the first major bridge to be built across the Thames since the medieval London Bridge, is marked as "New Bridge".The expansion of Westminster in the 18th century necessitated an alternative to the timber Putney Bridge, the only river crossing west of the City.The grey blocks featured on this map are new buildings on the new streets near the approach to Westminster Bridge. Thomas Lediard Esq
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Plan of Duck Island in St. James's Park of which M. St. Evremond was appointed Governor by Charles 2d.

This is a plan of the Decoy in St James's Park, copied from a drawing made in 1734. A manuscript addition in the top left hand corner refers to a new pond. Smith, John Thomas
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Insurance Plan of London Western District Vol. A: sheet 6-1

1 : 480 This detailed 1901 plan of London is one of a series of forty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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A Groundplot of part of the Citty of WESTMINSTER [Showing the route of the Procession from the Hall to the Abbey of the Coronation of James II 23rd of April 1685]

1 : 912 The route of the Coronation of King James II in 1685 was lined with His Majesty's Troop of Horses and Regiments of Footguards, represented on this map by groups of circles. At the time there were standing armies of nearly 20,000 men in British kingdoms. The procession moved from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey. James converted to Catholicism in 1669, but despite this he succeeded to the throne peacefully at the age of 51. Aiming for religious toleration, James issued the Declaration of Indulgence in 1687. The following year his son, James Stuart, was born to his second wife, the Catholic Mary of Modena, arousing fear that a Roman Catholic dynasty would be established. The Protestant husband of James's elder daughter, William of Orange, invaded on 5 November 1688 and the army and the navy rallied to William, precipitating James' escape to France. James was defeated at the Battle of the Boyne, in Ireland, when he tried to reclaim the throne in 1690. He spent the rest of his life in exile in France, dying there in 1701.
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MEMORIALS OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR IMPROVING WESTMINSTER 1811

This plan was ordered by the House of Commons. Different colours are used to denote buildings to be affected by renovations in Westminster. John Nash was a driving force behind many improvements in the Regency period, and his ideas of widening streets continued to influence city planning after his retirement. The narrow streets around Westminster Abbey had long been a dangerous area, with its mixture of criminals, courtiers, pilgrims and the wealthy. This was compounded by the abbey precincts being historically afforded sanctuary from the law. The widening of streets in such areas aimed to disperse the slums and tenements, opening them to light, air and policing. The area covered by this plan is where the modern Victoria Street and Parliament Square would be placed in the 1850s and 60s. Basire, J.
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Report from Commissioners under 46 Geo III. For Improvements in Westminster.

This plan was ordered by the House of Commons, showing the property that needed to be bought and demolished to make way for the improvements at Westminster Bridge. The watermen who were made largely redundant by this new structure were paid 163;25,000 in compensation. Basire, J.
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A Plan of the Improvements at Westminster

1 : 800 The building of Westminster Bridge involved replanning and rebuilding around the approaches. New buildings, stables and coach houses marked out on this plan.
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Insurance Plan of London West Vol. A: sheet 6-1

1 : 480 This detailed 1891 plan of London is one of a series of fourteen sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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A MAPP of the Parish of St MARGARETS Westminster taken from the last Survey with Corrections 7A

1 : 3692 This is John Strype's first edition of Stow's survey. John Stow was a retired sailor who dedicated his retirement to gathering information from records and residents of the Georgian city.The survey extended to include London and Westminster in their entirety, capturing London between Restoration and 18th-century developments.The land on Mill Bank is denoted "Marshy Ground". Renowned for its unhealthy damp atmosphere,it would become the site of the infamous Millbank Penitentiary, and later Tate Britain. Above this a "New Church" is in the process of completion. This would become St John's. Although the survey proved popular, Stow died in poverty at the age of 80, having been granted licence to beg by James I. Stow, John
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le Palais et Park de St. James. St James Palace and Park

St James's Palace was built by Henry VIII on the site of St James's Hospital, Westminster. It became the principal royal residence in London, after the destruction by fire of Whitehall Palace in 1698. This bird's-eye view shows in detail the palace and grounds, the elevation of the building and the layout of the ornamental gardens. The Admiralty Office is shown on the boundaries of the palace grounds. Kip, J.
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Plan of the Parish of St. Margaret, Westminster From Lea & Morden's Map

1 : 6336 The Abbey, Manchester House and the parish church are shown in elevation. The Decoy in St James' Park is shown. Robert Lea
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Sketch of the Procession Usually Observed in the Coronation of our KINGS & QUEENS together with a PLAN pointing out Several new Paths and their Parts Adjacent

A sketch of individuals and their order in the coronation procession is featured at the top of the page.60 years as king, George III's was the second longest reign in British history. He was third Hanoverian monarch, but the first to be born in England and use English as his first language. His reign was curtailed by periodic bouts of mental instability,which many contemporary commentators ascribed to the strain of the American conflict,but was more likely caused by the hereditary physical disorder called porphyria. He was a cultured monarch who donated to the nation a royal collection of books as the nucleus of a national library, now held in the King's Tower;in the British Library.
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A PLAN of the Streets in the united Parishes of ST. MARGARET & ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Westminster. From a Survey made by I.H. Taylor. No. 22 PARLIAMENT STREET 1828.

Plan of the parishes of St Margaret's, outlined in blue line, and St James', delineated in pink, Westminster. A thin red line shows the boundary of the Tothill Fields District. The large 6-petal structure depicted at lower left is Millbank Penitentiary, built in response to requests for prison reform and finally completed in 1821. Taylor, J. H.
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London (1915- Numbered sheets) V.13 (includes: City Of Westminster) - 25 Inch Map

1 : 2500 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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London (Edition of 1894-96) LXXV (includes: City Of Westminster) - 25 Inch Map

1 : 2500 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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London (First Editions c1850s) XLIII (includes: City Of Westminster) - 25 Inch Map

1 : 2500 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Insurance Plan of London: General Key Plan

1 : 4800 This "key plan" indicates coverage of the Goad 1889 series of fire insurance maps of London that were originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Drawn plan of the Goring Estate] 3

This is a copy by Crace of a plam of the Goring Estate as it was in 1640. The drawing shows the site in Mulberry Garden Fields where Buckingham Palace was built. Crace, Frederick
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Views of London in 1616 and 1890

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WESTMINSTER

This plan-view of Westminster was published in Norden's 'Speculum Britanniae' in 1593. The title appears at top right below the royal arms, with a compass rose at the foot of the plate. Under different jurisdiction than the City of London, Westminster had developed during the middle ages into a centre of royal administration. Along the Strand are the former residences of the Bishops deposed at the Reformation. By the late 16th Century, these properties were in the hands of the Queen's courtiers, statesmen and other people of influence. Norden, John
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