Maps of Islington

Maps of Islington

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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 320~r_4

1 : 480 This detailed 1890 plan of London is one of a series of thirty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 320

1 : 480 This detailed 1899 plan of London is one of a series of twenty-eight sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 320-3

1 : 960 This detailed 1890 plan of London is one of a series of thirty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 322

1 : 480 This detailed 1899 plan of London is one of a series of twenty-eight sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 320-1

1 : 960 This detailed 1890 plan of London is one of a series of thirty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 321

1 : 480 This detailed 1899 plan of London is one of a series of twenty-eight sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: sheet 320-2

1 : 960 This detailed 1890 plan of London is one of a series of thirty-one sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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A New & Exact Plan of ye City of LONDON, detail showing Spitalfields

Detail showing Bethnal Green from Bowles' folding map of London of 1731. This is a later edition of the map first issued by Bowles in 1719 extended to include Stepney and the Isle of Dogs. Bowles based this part of the map on Gascoigne’s Survey of Stepney of 1703. Gascoigne, J.
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London VII.57 - OS London Town Plan

1 : 1056 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. V: Key Plan 2

1 : 480 This detailed 1887 plan of London is one of a series of twenty-five sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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A Map of the Parish of St. Dunstans Stepney, als. Stebunheath.

A. Churchill
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St. MARY, WHITE CHAPEL and St. JOHN; WAPPING Parish taken from y.e last Survey with Corrections and Additions

1 : 5400 Plan of the parishes of St. Mary, White Chapel and St. John, Wapping published in Strype's 1755 edition of Stow's "Survey of England". The plan features title, in cartouche, compass and key to places in the parishes down the right side of the plate and scale bar at lower left. Blome, Richard
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London (1915- Numbered sheets) V.11 (includes: Bethnal Green; London; Shoreditch; Stepney) - 25 Inch Map

1 : 2500 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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General Plan of the City of London

Haywood, William London
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A new and exact plan of the city of London and suburbs thereof, 3

1 Blatt : 58 x 50 cm Henry Overton
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Insurance Plan of London: sheet 7

This detailed 1889 plan of London is one of a series of six sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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Insurance Plan of London Vol. XI: Key Plan

1 : 4800 This "key plan" indicates coverage of the Goad 1890 series of fire insurance maps of London that were originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks. The building footprints, their use (commercial, residential, educational, etc.), the number of floors and the height of the building, as well as construction materials (and thus risk of burning) and special fire hazards (chemicals, kilns, ovens) were documented in order to estimate premiums. Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded. Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Goad Ltd. dating back to 1885. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 1:480 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 1:600 (1 inch to 50 feet). Chas E Goad Limited Chas E Goad Limited
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LONDINIUM

The author of this plan of Roman London, John Britton, was an antiquary and passionate advocate of the preservation of ancient monuments. The plan shows the Roman wall, gates, street plan and road network, with some prominent architectural and geographical features presented pictorially. Britton, John
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An exact Surveigh of the Streets, Lanes, and Churches contained within the ruines of the City of London, first described in six plats

N. Brooke
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AN EXACT SURVEIGH OF THE STREETS LANES AND CHVRCHES CONTAINED WITHIN THE RVINES OF THE CITY OF LONDON FIRST DESCRIBED IN SIX PLATS

1 : 3620 This map was reduced by John Leake from a large-scale survey on six sheets produced in December 1666 to assess the damage caused by the great fire. No copy of this large scale survey has ever been found. This is the second edition of this map, Updated and issued in 1669 with a dedication to Sir William Turner, The Lord Mayor of London for that year. The map's title appears along the top of the manuscript, With the City arms and dedication at top centre. The key to buildings destroyed in the fire appears in a table at top right, With a compass star at bottom right, Scale bar and imprint at bottom left, And an illustration of the city on fire inset at top left. The location of livery halls destroyed in the fire is indicated by their respective coats of arms. Letters identify individual City wards, With ward boundaries indicated by a pecked line. Buildings outside the city walls, Undamaged by the fire, Are represented three dimensionally. Leake, John
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An Exact Map representing the conditions of the late famous and flourishing City of London

1 : 6336 Engraved map of London and suburbs (including Lincoln Inn Fields, Finsbury Fields, Smith Fields and Bankside in Southwark) in which barren city wards contrast with birds eye views of surviving buildings outside the city, showing at a glancethe extent of the damage to the city caused by the great fire of 1666. The map features title along the top, with arms of the city and compass rose depicted at top left and right respectively. Also by Pricke is the inset map in the panel at the foot of the plate. Entitled "A map of the Whole City of London and Westminster with the Suburbs, Whearein May Be Judged What Proportion is Burnt and What Remains Standing", this smaller scale map (two inches to the mile) is flanked by reference tables with key to churches and halls of the London Livery companies. Pricke, Robert
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An Actual Survey of the Parish of St. Leonard in Shoreditch, Middlesex, taken in the Year 1745 by Peter Chassereau. 4

1 : 3000 Plan of the parish of St. Leonard in Shoreditch with title in cartouche at top left, compass at top right, scale bar at bottom centre and key to streets, courts, alleys, squares etc. in table at lower right. Each field in the parish is shown with the name of the landlord or tenant and the dimensions. Chassereau
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A guide for Cuntrey men In the famous Cittey of LONDON by the helpe of wich plot they shall be able to know how farr it is to any Street...

This 1593 map is the direct forbear of the modern London A-Z. This copy comes from the 1653 edition of John Norden's 'Speculum Britainiae' (literally: 'Mirror of Britain'), re-issued after Norden's death and sold by Peter Stent of Newgate. Around the edges of the map appear the coats of arms of the twelve most influential and wealthy city guilds: the 'Great Liveries'. Guild members became known as liverymen because they wore a distinctive livery or uniform. At top right is the Merchant Tailors company, which made tents and padded tunics during the middle ages. This is reflected by the tent motif on the coat of arms. Norden, John
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the Cittie of London 31

This map has been attributed to Augustus Ryther, an engraver who prospered between 1572 and 1592, contributing to Saxton's Atlas of 1579. This plan was produced to satisfy a European market, and contains certain inaccuracies which a native Londoner would not have tolerated. The streets appear very much wider than they were in actuality. Houses are depicted as having large gardens, when these had, in fact, begun to disappear from London two centuries before. The map details the gap at the north end of London Bridge, caused by a fire in 1632. Ryther, Augustus
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the Cittie of London 32

This map has been attributed to Augustus Ryther, an engraver who prospered between 1572 and 1592, contributing to Saxton's Atlas of 1579. This plan was produced to satisfy a European market, and contains certain inaccuracies which a native Londoner would not have tolerated. The streets appear very much wider than they were in actuality. Houses are depicted as having large gardens, when these had, in fact, begun to disappear from London two centuries before. Due to the scarcity of maps of London this rather misleading map was printed several times. This is the second edition. The map-seller's imprint has been removed and a large compass rose has been inserted. The Globe playhouse has been omitted on this edition, because of the theatre's destruction in 1644. Hoge Lane, Bedlam and Finsbury Fields have also been added. The map is shows the water conduit near Fleet Bridge, an important link in the water supply line from St Pancras. Ryther, Augustus
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Vrbium Londini et West-Monasterii nec non suburbii Southwark accurata ichnographia, 2

1 Blatt : 52 x 62 cm Homännische Erben
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LONDINIUM Augusta

1 : 11019 The title of this engraved map of Roman London appears along the top, with compass rose at top right.The arms of the Count of Pembroke, to whom the map is dedicated, are depicted at bottom right. Published in 'Itinerarium Curiosum' by William Stukeley, an antiquarian with a scholarly interest in sacred history, the plan shows the Roman street plan and road network, with illustrated views of the city wall and other prominent architectural and geographical features. Stukeley, Dr. William
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The Jew in London. A study of racial character and present-day conditions.

Arkill, G.E. T. Fisher Unwin
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The City of LONDON in the Time of the Saxons (about the Year 1000) compiled from the most authentic DOCUMENTS

Map of London in the reign of the Saxon King Ethelred II, with the history of Roman and Saxon London written in a panel below the plan. The map shows the Roman wall still standing, but the street plan suggests that, compared to the Roman period, the built-up area occupied a much smaller part of the walled city and that the population was in rapid decline. Wallis
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Englands glory, or, the glory of England being a new mapp of the city of London : shewing the remarkable streets, lanes, alleyes, churches, halls courts, and other places as they are now rebuilt, the which will therefore be a guide to strangers, and such as are not well acquainted herein to direct them from place to place : diverse faults y[t] are in y[e] former are in this amended, allsoe the severall figures y[t] stand up and downe in the mapp are explained in y[e] 2 tables at y[e] upper corners hereof.

Walton, Robert, 1618-1688 Robert Walton
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