Maps of Norfolk

Maps of Norfolk

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NORFOLCIAE comitatus Sheet 17

This map of Norfolk is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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NORFOLCIAE comitatus f.40

This is a map of Norfolk. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. This map is different from others in the series as it shows the county divided into administrative units called hundreds’ These are indicated by an alphabetical key, differentiated by colour and referenced to a index. Lord Burghley has added several place names. The map was engraved by Cornelius Hogius, one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Hogius, Cornelius
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NORTFOLCIA; | NORFOLKE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Nortfolcia vernacule Norfolke

1 : 260000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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An accurate map of the county of Norfolk

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 52 x 70 cm Bowen; Hinton sold by I. Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church yard
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Nortfolcia; vernacule Norfolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 36 x 47 cm Valck; Schenk penes Gerardum Valk et Petrum Schenk
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Nortfolcia

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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Norfolk, Sheet 15 - Bartholomew's "Half Inch to the Mile Maps" of England & Wales

1 : 126720 Topographic maps Bartholomew, John George John Bartholomew & Co
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Sheets 35-36. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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SUFFOLCIAE Comitatus f.38

This is a map of Suffolk by Christopher Saxton which dates from 1576. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. This map, unlike many of the others in the series, is divided into administrative units called hundreds which are shown by areas of different coloured. Lord Burghley has added information to the map, particularly along the coast line, knowledge of which was vital for defence.The map was engraved by Lenaert Terwoot, one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Terwoot, Lenaert
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SUFFOLCIAE Comitatus Sheet 16

This map of Suffolk is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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SVFFOLCIA. | Vernacule | SVFFOLKE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Suffolcia vernacule Suffolke

1 : 240000 Joannes Janssonius excudit. [Amstelodami] : [apud Joannem Janssonium]
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An accurate map of the county of Suffolk

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 50 x 69 cm Bowen; Hinton sold by I. Hinton at the Kings Arms in St. Pauls Church Yard
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Suffolcia vernacula Suffolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 36 x 47 cm Valck; Schenk penes Gerardum Valk et Petrum Schenk
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Svffolcia, vernacule Svffolke

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 37 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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A general plott and description of the Fennes and surounded grounds in the sixe counties of Norfolke, Suffolke, Cambridge

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 44 x 55 cm Valck; Schenk sumptibus G. Valk et P. Schenk
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Regiones invndatæ in finibus comitatus Norfolciæ, Svffolciæ, Cantabrigiæ, Hvntingtoniæ Northamtoniæ, et Lincolniæ

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 43 x 54 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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A general plott and description of the Fennes and surounded grounds in the sixe counties of Norfolke, Suffolke, Cambridge

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 44 x 55 cm Mercator; Hondius sumptibus Henrici Hondii
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A general plott and description of the Fennes and surounded grounds in the sixe counties of Norfolke, Suffolke, Cambridge, with in the Isle of Ely, Huntington, Northampton and Lincolne etc.

1 : 180000 Amstelodami : sumptibus Joannis Janssonii
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REGIONES | INVNDATÆ | In finibus Comitatus | NORFOLCIÆ, SUFFOLCIÆ, | CANTABRIGIÆ, HVNTINGTONIÆ | NORTHAMTONIÆ, et | LINCOLNIÆ

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Fakenham - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Norwich - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Kings Lynn - OS One-Inch Map

1 : 63360 Topographic maps Ordnance Survey Ordnance Survey
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Feltwell St. Nicholas

1 : 31680 The pecked red line following the course of the Little Ouse marks the county boundary of Norfolk and Cambridgeshire. Drawn on the left of the sheet, along the Ouse Valley, is a patchwork of arable land divided by straight water-filled dykes, typical features of the fens landscape. This elaborate system of drains and river diversions was designed in the 17th century by a Dutch engineer called Vermuyden. It made possible the conversion of pasture to arable land in this region. Yeakell, Thomas
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Wells

1 : 31680 This plan covers the North Norfolk coast and features some of the most distinctive salt-marshes, inter-tidal flats, dunes, shingle and grazing marshes in Europe. Near Wells-next-the-Sea is Holkham Park with its triumphal arch indicated along the southern approach. This was the path visitors from London and Newmarket would have taken to Wells. At the highest point of the park, aligned with the arch, is the obelisk of Holkham Park Mansion and Kent's North Lodges. Budgen, Charles
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Cromer

1 : 31680 This plan records the Norfolk coastline, famous for its remote and diverse landscape. Sweeping sandy beaches, grass-tufted dunes and tidal inlets are all depicted. Light pencil interlinings ('hachures') are used to represent the gently rolling chalkland and glacial moraines leading away from the coast. Budgen, Charles
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E. Harling

1 : 31680 The words 'Trig Point' are noted to the far left of the drawing, below Bodney. They indicate points from which angular measurements were taken in order to plot accurately the location of prominent landscape features. The pencil interlining ('hachuring') and shading that indicate relief have been lightly applied, leaving the road network clearly visible. The detail with which the roads are rendered is indicative of the Ordnance Survey's military imperative. Metcalf, Edward B.
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