Maps of Gloucestershire

Maps of Gloucestershire

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Ordnance Survey of England and Wales (Aeronautical map)

Great Britain. War Office. General Staff. Geographical Section [London] : [Air Ministry],
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A new travelling map of the country round London, 1

1 Blatt : 49 x 61 cm J. Andrews & A. Drury
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England and Wales 1:253,440

Ordnance Survey
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delineation of the strata of England and Wales, with part of Scotland

1 : 320000 Blatt 10 Smith, William Cary
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DRAKE'S MAP OF THE LONDON AND BIRMINGHAM RAILWAY and DRAKE'S MAP OF THE GRAND JUNCTION RAILWAY

The first map shows the London and Birmingham Railway, with an illustrated view of Euston Station at top right. The second shows the Grand Junction Railway (which connected Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool) with an illustration of a train used on the line along the top. The titles of both maps appear above the relevant plans, with county boundaries outlined in colour. A level section of the railway line is given in a panel below each plan. Wollace, J. B.
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WIGORNIENSIS | Comitatus et Comitatus | WARWICENSIS| nec non | COVENTRÆ LIBERTAS | WORCESTER, WARWIK SHIRE. | and THE LIBERTY OF COVENTRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Map of Worcestershire

This is a manuscript map of Worcestershire. The date and draughtsman are not known. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. The dominant features of the landscape are the waterways and the parks which are shown by symbols of fenced enclosures. These were of central importance to any military campaign. The fastest way to move a lot of men and weaponry was by river and parks provided somewhere for troops to set up camp and for horses to graze. Lord Burghley has annotated the map. In the left margin he has added a list of residents of the area and what lands and properties they are associated with, inserting some of these into the map itself. This is a good indication of how detailed was the knowledge accumulated by Burghley. William Cecil, Lord Burghley
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WARWIC LECESTRIAQUE Comitat.

This is a map of Warwickshire and Leicestershire by Christopher Saxton dating from 1576. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. The map was engraved by Leonardus Terwoordus , one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produced the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Terwoordus, Leonardus Anterpianus
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WARWIC LECESTRIAE Comitat

This map of Warwickshire and Leicestershireis from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton’s name appears in the decorative scale bar, as does the name of the engraver of this map, Leonardus Terwoordus, one of a team of seven Flemish and continentally trained English engravers employed to work on the atlas. Relief, in the form of uniform rounded representations of hills, is the main topographical feature presented in the maps. Rather than provide a scientific representation of relative relief these give a general impression of the lie of the land. Settlements and notable buildings are also recorded pictorially; a small building with a spire represents a village, while more important towns, such as Leicester are indicated by groups of building. Rivers, streams, parks and woodlands are also depicted carefully. Woods are shown by small tree-symbols, with clusters representing forests, and parklands enclosed with ring fences. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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GLOCESTRIAE Sive Claudiocestriae Comitat.

This is a map of Gloucestershire by Christopher Saxton dating from 1577. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Burghley has annotated this map, adding place names along the river Sabrina Flu and at points on other rivers near Bristol. Dotted lines have also been added, possibly indicating communication routes. Black marks have been added at tributary mouths. These additions to the waterways of the area possibly reflect a concern that enemy invaders could sail up the Bristol Channel. At this time England was under threat of invasion from Catholic Spain, a threat which culminated in the events of the Spanish Armada. The map was engraved by Augustinus Ryther, the most accomplished of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Ryther,Augustinus
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VIGORNIENSIS Comitatus Sheet 21

This map of Worcestershire is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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Glocestria Ducatus, cum Monumethensi Comitatu = Glocester Shire & Monmouth Shire

1 : 280000 [Amstelodami] : [apud Joannem Janssonium]
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Sheets 31-32. (Cary's England, Wales, and Scotland).

1 : 360000 Cary, John, ca. 1754-1835
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GLOCESTRAE Sive Claudiocestriae Comitat

This map of Gloucestershire is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales.This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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Wigorniensis comitatus et comitatus Warwicensis; nec non Coventræ libertas

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 40 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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Herefordia Comitatus vernacule Hereford Shire

1 : 280000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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Wigorniensis Comitatus cum Warwicensi, nec non Conventriae Libertas

1 : 180000 Amstelodami : apud Joannem Janssonium
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GLOCESTRIA, | DVCATVS; | Vulgo | GLOCESTER | SHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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HEREFORDIAE COMITATUS Sheet 23

This map of Herefordshire is from the 1583 edition of the Saxton atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing used of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Here Saxton’s name appears in the decorative scale bar, as does the name of the engraver of this map, Remigius Hogenberg , one of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produced the copper plates for the atlas. The cartouche is mounted by the Elizabethan coat of arms and the Seckford arms of appear in the bottom right corner. The adjacent counties are named but lack any internal detail, recording only the path of rivers that cross county boundaries. Saxton, Christopher Ryther, Augustine
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HEREFORDIAE COMITATUS f.95

This is a map of Herefordshire by Christopher Saxton dating from 1577. It forms part of an atlas that belonged to William Cecil Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s Secretary of State. Burghley used this atlas to illustrate domestic matters. This map is actually a proof copy of one which forms part of Christopher Saxton’s Atlas of England and Wales. This atlas was first published as a whole in 1579. It consists of 35 coloured maps depicting the counties of England and Wales. The atlas is of great significance to British cartography as it set a standard of cartographic representation in Britain and the maps remained the basis for English county mapping, with few exceptions, until after 1750. During the reign of Elizabeth I, map use became more common, with many government matters referring to increasingly accurate maps with consistent scales and symbols, made possible by advances in surveying techniques. Illustrating the increasing use of maps in government matters, Lord Burghley, who had been determined to have England and Wales mapped in detail from the 1550s, selected the cartographer Christopher Saxton to produce a detailed and consistent survey of the country. The financier of the project was Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests at the Court of Elizabeth I, whose arms appear, along with the royal crest, on each map. Burghley has annotated this map, underlining the information printed at Kinnaston chap Wch Was dreven downe by the removing of the ground. The map was engraved by Remigius Hogenbergius, one of a team of seven English and Flemish engravers employed to produce the copper plates for the atlas. Saxton, Christopher Hogenbergius, Remigius
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Glocestria dvcatvs, Monvmethensi comitatu

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 39 x 49 cm Valck; Schenk penes G. Valk et P. Schenk
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HEREFORDIA | COMITATVS. | HEREFORD-SHIRE.

[Amsterdam : Joan Blaeu]
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Glocestria dvcatvs; vulgo Glocester Shire

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 40 x 48 cm Blaeu Joan Blaeu
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An accurate map of the counties Gloucester and Monmouth

1 Karte : Kupferdruck ; 51 x 66 cm Tinney; Bowles; Sayer; Bowles; Bowles printed for T. Bowles in St. Pauls Church Yard Rob.t Sayer and John Tinney in Fleet Street and John Bowles and son in Cornhil
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